Fortunately, Polar Vortex is rare

Polar vortex is a system of strong, upper-level winds that normally surround the North Pole in a counterclockwise direction. These winds normally affect Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere but sometimes they become distorted and dip much farther south, causing cold air to spill southward. The result is a jet stream effect that plunges deep into southern latitudes, bringing the cold, dense Arctic air spilling down with it. Serious cold snaps happen several times a year, though in different regions of the world and with different severities. Last March saw a significant decrease in temperature because of the polar vortex pushing into much of Europe. Many locations experienced an Easter holiday that was much colder than their Christmas holiday. The United Kingdom, for instance, had its coldest March in 50 years. Generally, people were not prepared for The Polar Vortex that struck the United States in early January 2014. 178 million people in all 50 states experienced temperatures below 32 degrees — even Hawaii. The huge dose of polar air caused 21 deaths and the majority succumbed due to below zero temperatures. So, what’s it like dying from freezing temperatures? Hypothermia is a condition in which the body's core temperature drops below the required level for normal metabolism and body functions. It causes slurred speech, sluggishness, incoherent and irrational behavior, amnesia, the inability to use hands and stumbling. Also, the exposed skin becomes blue and puffy.  An apparent self-protective behavior known as terminal burrowing occurs in the final stages of hypothermia. The afflicted will find small, enclosed spaces such as underneath beds or in closets. Researchers claim this is an autonomous process of the brain stem, which is triggered in the final state of hypothermia and produces a primitive and burrowing-like behavior of protection, as seen in hibernating animals such as bears, squirrels, crocodiles, bats, bees and several species of fish.Polar vortex is a system of strong, upper-level winds that normally surround the North Pole in a counterclockwise direction. These winds normally affect Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere but sometimes they become distorted and dip much farther south, causing cold air to spill southward. The result is a jet stream effect that plunges deep into southern latitudes, bringing the cold, dense Arctic air spilling down with it. Serious cold snaps happen several times a year, though in different regions of the world and with different severities. Last March saw a significant decrease in temperature because of the polar vortex pushing into much of Europe. Many locations experienced an Easter holiday that was much colder than their Christmas holiday. The United Kingdom, for instance, had its coldest March in 50 years. Generally, people were not prepared for The Polar Vortex that struck the United States in early January 2014. 178 million people in all 50 states experienced temperatures below 32 degrees — even Hawaii. The huge dose of polar air caused 21 deaths and the majority succumbed due to below zero temperatures. So, what’s it like dying from freezing temperatures? Hypothermia is a condition in which the body's core temperature drops below the required level for normal metabolism and body functions. It causes slurred speech, sluggishness, incoherent and irrational behavior, amnesia, the inability to use hands and stumbling. Also, the exposed skin becomes blue and puffy.  An apparent self-protective behavior known as terminal burrowing occurs in the final stages of hypothermia. The afflicted will find small, enclosed spaces such as underneath beds or in closets. Researchers claim this is an autonomous process of the brain stem, which is triggered in the final state of hypothermia and produces a primitive and burrowing-like behavior of protection, as seen in hibernating animals such as bears, squirrels, crocodiles, bats, bees and several species of fish.

Source, Wikipedia

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